Working in Poland

Poland is the gateway between Western and Eastern Europe and is part of an evolving region with a growing economy. You'll have a better chance of securing a job if you can speak Polish. While English and German are the most commonly spoken foreign languages, neither is by any means commonly used or understood.

It may be relatively easy to find part-time or temporary work, but securing a full-time graduate level role may be more difficult, particularly with the high unemployment rate that Poland faces.

A lot of graduates, even from the best universities in Poland, have difficulties in finding a good job. While wages are increasing, many Polish graduates come to the UK to work as they get a better salary.

To improve your chances of getting a good job in Poland, try to gain extra qualifications and work experience. Knowledge and practical skills in a certain sector will help and foreign language and IT skills are popular with employers.

Where can you work?

  • Major industries: machine building, food processing and beverages, chemicals, iron and steel, shipbuilding, glass, textiles, coal mining.
  • Industries in decline: agriculture and metalwork.
  • Shortage occupations: sales representatives and general office, industrial, construction and technical workers.
  • Major companies: PKO Bank Polski (regional banks), PGE (electric utilities), Grupa PZU (insurance), Pgnig Group (oil and gas), KGHM Polska Miedz (metals and mining), PKN Orlen (oil and gas), Tauron Group (electric utilities).

Hot Occupation List

  • Hospitality Professional
  • Goggliest
  • Biotechnology
  • Engineer Professional

Eligibility Criteria

  • Must be a valid passport holder
  • Should be 18 years above
  • Minimum Graduate Mandatory
  • 1 to 3 years of minimum exp
  • No language barriers

Minimum Salary Wage

  • 2000 PLN /Month (Minimum)
  • Per week hrs of work - You work for 40 hrs/week

Documents

  • Experience Letter
  • Education Certificate
  • Passport
  • ITR
  • Rest all your documentation manager shall guide you.

Applying for jobs

Both foreign and Polish jobseekers can use the services of the Polish District Labour Offices to help find employment. These can be found in many of the major towns and you'll need to register by taking in your education certificates, any work-related certificates and personal ID. Opportunities through the District Labour Offices may be limited however and you may find better results with private recruitment agencies.

You can also apply for jobs online through recruitment websites, which can be done from outside of Poland. However, you may need to visit the country for some of the interview stages.

The interview process is similar to that in the UK and varies depending on the employer. You may be asked to take your certificates or references along to the interview; if you do make sure you find out if they should be translated into Polish.



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